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Customized Games to Train Your Sales Reps on Automation Basics

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Customized Games to Train Your Sales Reps on Automation Basics

Automation is the in-thing which is driving productivity, agility, flexibility, and optimization. It is no longer an alternative but has become a part of our lives. When we think about or visualize automation, robots in factories, and humanoids in offices come to our mind.

Sales people who sell their company’s automation products should have knowledge on “Automation basics”. This enables them promote and recommend appropriate products to their customers. But it is not their core competency, and training sales reps on a totally different subject must be done in a captivating and appealing way. So what do you think? Is there any way to make your training more interactive and engaging to learners? What should be done to ‘inject life’ into the sales training?

One of the ways is to incorporate gamification in your online sales training. This can be done by modifying popular games to fit into the training, depending on the content and concept. In this blog, I will share a few ideas to gamify your online sales training.

1. On the Lines of a ‘Board Game’

Build a background at the beginning. If there are 7 units in the course, divide the board into 7 partitions. The learner has to roll a dice at the bottom right corner to start the game. Based on the pips on the dice, he goes to a particular unit. When the piece stops on a square, the learner has to draw a card from the right hand side in order to enter that unit.

We can have two players (the learner and the virtual competitor). When the learner answers the “knowledge check after each unit” correctly, he will get the wedge; else the competitor will earn the wedge. Here we can challenge the learner to earn a minimum of 5 wedges out of 7 to go to the Summary and Final Quiz. Again in the Final Quiz, we can ask the learner to score 80% (out of 100%) to pass the course.

Board Game

2. On the Basis of a “Maze” Game

Set the context with the story of a sales person who starts from his Company to visit a customer to sell a product (X). On the way he comes across a maze he has to travel through to reach his customer. Also, he has to face a few obstacles on the way in the form of “The Automation Challenge”. This can consist of questions at the end of each unit. The learner should be educated on the key concepts of each unit before posing the questions. In case of an incorrect answer, he has to retry and get it correct.

Once he reaches his customer, he will use all his acquired knowledge to answer the customer questions. This is the final test at the end of the course. Here the sales person has to pass the course and successfully sell the product to his customer.

Maze game

3. On the Foundation of “Who Wants to be a Millionaire” Game

We can create a hub wherein learners will have access to different units in the form of levels. Each level will have a set of questions and the number of questions depends on the complexity of that particular unit. When the learner enters a level, he should be provided sufficient information related to that topic, only then should he be asked questions. On giving the right answer, the learner will earn some amount. If he answers incorrectly, the learner should be given an opportunity to refer the hints (reference link, 50-50, etc.). If he selects the wrong answer the second time, he will proceed to the next question/level but will not earn any amount. Also, the learner has to get a minimum of 80% to pass the course.

Who Wants to be a Millionaire Game

These are some ideas based on which you can develop online courses on automation basics for your sales people. No doubt, there are many other ways to create gamified courses that hook the attention of learners. So, while developing online courses, what games do you use?

Please share your thoughts in the comments section below!

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